Countless people endure sleeping problems that prevent them from getting the recommended 7 to 8 hours of sleep every night. In fact, insomnia has become such a widespread problem, the U.S. government has identified inadequate sleep as a public health epidemic.

This troubling problem has led to an increased demand for sleep aids, which provide sedation effects that make people drowsy. With that being said, a new study indicates that many of these pharmaceuticals may not be much more effective than placebos.

No Better than a Sugar Pill?

Most prescription sleep aids aren’t much better than simple sugar pills, according to a study conducted by researchers from the University of Lincoln in the U.K, Harvard University and the University of Connecticut.

After looking at several clinical trials that studied the effects of Ambien, Lunesta and Sonata; researchers concluded that the drugs offered only slight benefits over placebos. In fact, they determined that prescription sleep aids only hastened sleep by around 20 minutes when compared to the placebo medications used in clinical studies.

In the end, the researchers say this recent study should serve as a basis for whether or not physicians should prescribe sleep aids to certain patients; especially since many prescription sleeping pills are addictive and often come with a host of troubling short- and long-term side-effects.

What if You Have Sleep Apnea?

Even if they worked 100 percent of the time without any troubling side-effects, prescription sleep aids wouldn’t be a good option for people who have sleep apnea. Since this dangerous disorder promotes breathing difficulties, it causes people to awaken frequently at night.

If you suffer from sleep apnea, you need a remedy that will put an end to these breathing disruptions, so you can sleep peacefully. An oral appliance can do that by adjusting the jaw to provide a clear, unobstructed airway.

To find out how this effective sleep apnea treatment can help you, contact Dr. Siegel's office today.

Related article: http://www.webmd.com/sleep-disorders/news/20121218/how-sleeping-pills-work