At the end of September, the three largest US soft drink companies pledged to try to reduce the number of beverage calories consumed by Americans by 20% in a historic agreement with the Alliance for a Healthier Generation and the Clinton Foundation. Coca-Cola, PepsiCo, and Dr. Pepper Snapple Group pledged to reach the goal by 2025 in the agreement which the American Dental Association (ADA) has come out in support of.

Why the ADA Backs This Agreement

Pepsi Vending MachineThe ADA has long stated that “reducing the portion sizes of sugary drinks may help reduce tooth decay.” In fact, new research published by British researchers suggest that cosmetic dentistry procedures.

How Beverage Companies Plan to Reduce Consumption

Beverage companies recognize that it’s possible for them to reduce consumption of sugary sodas and other drinks without necessarily reducing their sales or profit. Instead, they will turn their massive marketing and distribution machine around to convince us to drink more lower-sugar options, including smaller portions and water. They will change their distribution chain to ensure that there are always lower-sugar options available. Promoting these lower-sugar options at cooler cases and soda fountains is expected to help people choose them over higher-sugar options.

They also plan to introduce more low-sugar options so that people can find a lower-sugar alternative that they like.

What about the Acid?

This agreement is positive, but we also need to do something to address the fact that these beverages are not only full of sugar, they are highly acidic and destructive to the teeth on their own, even without the presence of oral bacteria.

Many sodas, including Coca-Cola, Pepsi, and Dr. Pepper have a pH under 3.0. For comparison, pure lemon juice has a pH of 2.0, and many strong acid solutions fall in the range of 2.0-3.0. Even uncarbonated sports drinks often achieve a pH of 3.2-3.0. The formulation of these drinks as so strongly acidic unnecessarily jeopardizes our oral health. For an example of how much damage can be caused without sugar, diet soda damages our teeth as bad as meth or crack cocaine.

Perhaps something can be done in the near future to reduce the acid level of these drinks, but in the meantime, use these tips to reduce damage to your teeth.

And if you have suffered damage to your teeth as a result of soda consumption, we can help. For an appointment with a Philadelphia cosmetic dentist, please call Dental Excellence of Blue Bell at (610) 272-0828.